Using Energy

When to Use Energy

Though using less energy is sometimes not an option, when energy is used can have a tremendous effect on climate change. This is because different methods of generating energy have vastly different consequences on the environment, and they are available at different times.

A graph of energy consumption in California over the course of the day, related to solar energy production.
Graph by Wikipedia Commons user ArnoldReinhold, under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 4.0 International license:https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Duck_Curve_CA-ISO_2016-10-22.agr.pngDuck by Elena G., Club USCA member.

Consuming Energy

Energy consumption is the cheapest on off-peak hours. On-peak hours are hours when electricity demand is the highest, meaning you pay a more expensive amount per kWh (kilowatt hour). Peak rates usually apply in the evening Monday to Friday around 4-9pm, where most energy is consumed in most households. Therefore, it is cheaper to plug in your devices during off peak hours, which are before 4 and after 9. It is better to use electricity early in the morning compared to in the afternoon.

Types of Renewable Energy

For more information, click the links below.

Bioenergy

Bioenergy is energy created from biomass, created from animals/plants that were recently alive.

  1. https://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-basics

Biomass

Biomass is a product made from organic sources that died recently.

  1. https://www.energy.gov/eere/bioenergy/bioenergy-basics

Geothermal Energy

Geothermal energy is energy that is generated through harnessing the heat within Earth.

  1. https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/geothermal/

Wind

Wind energy is created when wind causes wind turbines to move, which creates electricity.

  1. https://www.energy.gov/eere/wind/how-do-wind-turbines-work

Hydro Electric

Hydroelectricity uses water in motion to create electricity.

  1. https://www.nationalgeographic.org/encyclopedia/hydroelectric-energy/

Image by flickr user Michael Fludkov

Hydro Power

Hydro power uses the water cycle to produce electricity.

  1. https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/hydropower/

Ocean Power

Ocean power uses the movement of waves and currents and the ocean and transforms it into electricity.

  1. https://www.nrel.gov/research/re-ocean.html

Solar

Solar energy uses solar panels (pictured above) to harness the energy of the sun and turn it into electricity.

  1. https://www.energy.gov/eere/solar/how-does-solar-work

Image by wikimeida commons user Dani 7C3

Tidal Power

Tidal power harnesses the power of the tides and uses a barrage (pictured above) to create electricity.

  1. https://www.eia.gov/energyexplained/hydropower/tidal-power.php